(Spanish below)

Revolts, Outbursts, Revolutions. All these moments of disruption of the established order can be understood as “critical events” that occur to people in different ways in various parts of the world. In this book, we are interested in these “critical events” as triggers for processes of political subjectivation, especially in subjects with no prior history of politicization – indigenous peoples, urban poor, middle-class professionals, and workers.

Often labeled as “springs,” these events disrupt the hegemonic temporality of the events that produce the “normalcy” of current  historical narrative (Rancière 2012) and challenge the “natural” acceptance of a allegedly shared social order. The nature and effects of these disruptions are manifold; they can affect the “order of discourse” (Foucault 1971), the “national order of things” (Malkki 1995), question the “established order” of class, gender, and race (Adkins 2004, Bourdieu 1986, Chatterjee 2004), challenge the “liberal colonial order” of the self-sufficient and sovereign subject (Butler 2002; Mahmood 2005; Roy 2022), and contest the “order of family values” that the coexistence of neoliberalism and new social conservatism enhance (Cooper 2017; Ahmed 2010). In relation to the event, we understand the process of subjectivation as an unanticipated displacement, an inescapably incarnated, situated, and relational process.

By tracing the lived experiences of subjects who inhabited the Chilean social uprising, in a previous work we show how the analytically separated categories of critical event and subjectivation in fact overlap and enrich one another (Aedo, Bernasconi, Martinez, Olivari, Pairican, Porma 2024). On this ground we argue that when these types of ruptures are linked to unprecedented dynamics of political subjectivation, they act as critical events; that is, processes through which individuals with no background of political action become political subjects involved in issues of common interest; protagonists of the present history.

This previous work confines the cases of study and analysis to the Chilean social outburst. With the aim of substantially expanding the empirical scope of the study and opening up possibilities for comparative analysis and explanatory generalizations, we invite proposals for chapters for a book tentatively titled “Social Revolts as Events of Political Subjectivation.” We are interested in proposals supported by innovative, empirically grounded, and conceptually rigorous analyses that contribute to shedding light on the characteristics, effects, and possibilities of the intersection between critical events and new forms of political subjectivation in Latin America and other regions of the world.

Potential critical dimensions to be addressed in the book chapters may be:

  • Shattering of temporalities.
  • Disruptions of the self.
  • Self investment.
  • Political domesticities.
  • The occupation of the space and the performative power of the assembly.
  • Social outbursts’ affective and expressive force.
  • Connections with previous historical conflicts and relations of subordination.
  • The subject and the plural assemblage.
  • The repertoire of collective action and new forms of life.
  • Counter conducts and ethical positioning.
  • Redefinitions of self in relation to kinship and community.
  • Reorganization of public and private spheres.
  • Dissents and its effects upon the subject.
  • Self production and the redefinition of police and politics.
  • The role of territorial, ethnic, class, gender, and generational dimensions.

Interested people are asked to submit a chapter title and abstract jointly with author(s) brief biography in English language in a single word document no later than April 30, 2024 for consideration. Please submit materials to https://forms.gle/G98NyL1JXLScrWge8

Abstracts will be reviewed by the editors and successful authors will be asked to submit full drafts (max 6,000 words including notes and references) ahead of participation in an online symposium. After the symposium, a revised manuscript will be submitted to Publishers and peer review process. As with any submission, there is no guarantee of publication.

The book will be edited by Drs Angel Aedo, Oriana Bernasconi, Damian Martinez, Alicia Olivari, Fernando Pairican and Juan Porma.

Proposals should include:

  1. The name and contact information of the author(s)
  2. Author(s) bio (max 80 words)
  3. The title of the proposed contribution
  4. The abstract (max 500 words)
  5. 4-5 keywords

Proposal should be send to https://forms.gle/G98NyL1JXLScrWge8

Potential authors are encouraged to contact the editors to discuss ideas for theme and format. There is no article processing charge. Authors are encouraged to use high resolution images but will be required to request permission from copyright-holders when needed.

Book Timeline

  • 30 April 2024 – Initial Proposals: chapter title and abstracts and brief bio to book editors in English.
  • 15 May 2024 – Notification of Acceptance.
  • 15 July 2024 – Complete Draft chapter (6,000 words including notes and references)  submitted for circulation to symposium participants.
  • 31 July  2024 (time TBD) Hybrid symposium.
  • 30 September 2024 – Full submissions for peer review.
  • end 2024 – Fully revised submissions (and any image permissions) to book editors
  • 2025 – Publication

Editors

Angel Aedo is Associate Professor in Anthropology at Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile and Alternate Director at the Millennium Institute on Violence and Democracy Research.

Oriana Bernasconi is Professor of Sociology at Alberto Hurtado University where she also serves as Codirector of the Interdisciplinary Research Program on Memory and Human Rights. She is an associate researcher at the Millenium Institute on Violence and Democracy Research.

Damián Omar Martínez is Research Fellow “María Zambrano” at the Department of Sociology, University of Murcia (Spain) and Postdoctoral Researcher at the Millennium Institute on Violence and Democracy Research.

Alicia Olivari is Postdoctoral Researcher at the School of Anthropology of the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile and the Millennium Institute on Violence and Democracy Research.

Fernando Pairican, Ph.D. in History from the University of Santiago. Lecturer at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile and researcher at the Millennium Institute on Violence and Democracy Research.

Juan Porma is a History teacher, Master in Applied Social Sciences and PhD Candidate in History at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile.

References

Adkins L (2004) “Reflexivity: Freedom or habit of gender?” In Feminism After Bourdieu. Malden: Blackwell Publishing, 191-210.

Aedo A, Bernasconi O, Martinez D, Olivari A, Pairican F, Porma J (2024). Widening the Space of Politics. South Atlantic Quarterly, 123(1): 184-191. https://doi.org/10.1215/00382876-10920705

Ahmed S (2010) The Promise of Happiness. Duke University Press.

Bourdieu P (1986) Distinction. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.

Butler J (2002) Bodies and power, revisited. Radical Philosophy 114 (July/August): 13-19.

Chatterjee P (2004) The Politics of the Governed: Reflections on Popular Politics in

Most of the World. New York: Columbia University Press

Cooper M (2017) Family Values. Between Neoliberalism and the New Social Conservatism. Zone Books.

Foucault M (1971) Orders of discourse. Social Science Information, 10(2): 7-30.

Mahmood S (2005) The Politics of Piety: The Islamic Revival and the Feminist Subject. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Malkki L H (1995) Refugees and Exile: From “Refugee Studies” to the National Order of Things. Annual Review of Anthropology, 24: 495–523.

Rancière, Jacques. 2012. “In What Time Do We Live?” In The State of Things, edited by Marta Kuzma, Pablo Lafuente, and Peter Osborne, 11–38. London: Koenig.

Roy S (2022) Changing the Subject: Feminist and Queer Politics in Neoliberal India. Durham: Duke University Press.

LLAMADO A CONTRIBUCIONES PARA CAPÍTULOS DE LIBRO

 

“Revueltas sociales como eventos de subjetivación política”

Revueltas, Estallidos, Revoluciones. Todos estos momentos de disrupción del orden establecido pueden ser entendidos como “eventos críticos” que acontecen a la gente de diferentes maneras en distintas partes del mundo. En este libro estamos interesados en estos “eventos críticos” como gatilladores de procesos de subjetivación política, especialmente en aquellos sujetos sin historial previo de politización: pueblos indígenas, pobres urbanos, profesionales de clase media, trabajadores.

Denominados en muchos casos con el apelativo de “primaveras”, estos eventos perturban las temporalidades hegemónicas de los sucesos que producen la “normalidad” de la historia del presente (Rancière 2012) y quebrantan la aceptación –dada por “natural”– de un orden social compartido por las mayorías. La naturaleza y los efectos de estas disrupciones son múltiples y afectan el “orden del discurso” (Foucault, 1971), y el “orden nacional de las cosas” (Malkki 1995). También ponen en cuestión el “orden instituido” de clase, género y raza (Adkins 2004 , Bourdieu 1986, Chatterjee 2004), desconocen el “orden colonial liberal” del sujeto autosuficiente y soberano (Butler 2002; Mahmood, 2005 ; Roy 2022) e impugnan el “orden de los valores familiares” que cohabitan entre el neoliberalismo y el nuevo conservadurismo social (Cooper 2017; Ahmed, 2010). En relación al acontecimiento, comprendemos el proceso de subjetivación como un desplazamiento imprevisto y un proceso inevitablemente encarnado, situado y relacional.

Al rastrear las experiencias vividas por los sujetos que habitaron el estallido social chileno, hemos mostrado cómo las categorías analíticamente separadas de evento crítico y subjetivación, de hecho, se superponen y enriquecen entre sí (Aedo, Bernasconi, Martinez, Olivari, Pairican, Porma, 2024). En ese trabajo sostuvimos que cuando este tipo de quiebres se vinculan con dinámicas inéditas de subjetivación política, actúan como acontecimientos críticos; es decir, son procesos por los que individuos sin biografías previamente marcadas por la participación en organizaciones sociales o políticas ni injerencia en el espacio público, se convierten en sujetos políticos involucrados en problemas de interés común; protagonistas de la historia del presente.

Este trabajo previo circunscribe los casos de estudio y análisis al estallido social chileno. Con el objetivo de ampliar sustantivamente los ámbitos de estudio empírico y las posibilidades de análisis comparativo y de construcción de generalizaciones explicativas, hacemos un llamado a propuestas de capítulos para un libro titulado tentativamente “Revueltas sociales como eventos de subjetivación política”. Estamos interesados en propuestas apoyadas en análisis novedosos, empíricamente fundados y conceptualmente rigurosos, que contribuyan a arrojar luz sobre las características, los efectos y las posibilidades del encuentro entre acontecimientos críticos y nuevas formas de subjetivación política en América Latina y en otras regiones del mundo.

Dimensiones críticas potenciales que se abordarán en el libro pueden ser:

  • Ruptura de temporalidades.
  • Rupturas de la subjetividad.
  • Inversión en sí mismo.
  • Domesticidades políticas.
  • La ocupación del espacio y el poder performativo de la asamblea popular.
  • La fuerza afectiva y expresiva de los estallidos sociales.
  • Vinculaciones con conflictos históricos previos y relaciones de subordinación ancestrales.
  • El sujeto y la asamblea plural.
  • El repertorio de acción colectiva y nuevas formas de vida.
  • Contra-conductas y posicionamiento ético.
  • Redefinición del yo en relación al parentesco y la comunidad.
  • Reorganización de las esferas públicas y privadas.
  • Disenso y sus efectos sobre el sujeto.
  • Producción del yo y redefinición de la policía y la política.
  • El papel de las dimensiones territoriales, étnicas, de clase, género y generacional.

Para ser consideradas en esta publicación, las personas interesadas deben enviar el título del capítulo, el resumen y una síntesis de su biografía en un solo documento de Word a más tardar el 30 de abril de 2024. Por favor, envíe el material https://forms.gle/G98NyL1JXLScrWge8

Las propuestas iniciales serán revisadas por el equipo de editores/as. Las propuestas seleccionadas deberán enviar borradores completos (max 6,000 palabras) antes de participar en un simposio virtual especialmente diseñado para comentar los manuscritos. Posterior al simposio, el manuscrito del libro será enviado a editoriales internacionales donde se someterá a un proceso de revisión por pares. Como ocurre en cualquier envío, no hay garantía de publicación.

El libro será editado por las y los doctores Ángel Aedo, Oriana Bernasconi, Damián Martínez, Alicia Olivari y Fernando Pairican y Juan Porma.

Calendario de trabajo

  • 30 de abril de 2024 – Recepción de propuestas iniciales**: Título del capítulo, resúmenes y síntesis de su biografía.
  • 15 de mayo de 2024 – Notificación de aceptación.
  • 15 de julio de 2024 –  Envío de borrador de capítulo completo (max 6,000 palabras) que será compartido con participantes de simposio virtual.
  • 31 de julio de 2024 –  Simposio virtual  (horario por confirmar).
  • 30 de septiembre de 2024 – Envío de texto completo por ScholarOne para revisión por pares.
  • Fin de 2024 – Envío de textos revisados (y permiso de imágenes) a los editores del libro
  • 2025 – Publicación.

**Las propuestas iniciales deben incluir:

  1. El nombre y la información de contacto de la autora o autor.
  2. Biografía de la autora o autor (máximo 80 palabras).
  3. El título de la propuesta de contribución.
  4. El resumen (máximo de 500 palabras).
  5. Entre 4 y 5 palabras clave.

Las propuestas deben ser enviadas a https://forms.gle/G98NyL1JXLScrWge8

Potenciales autores son invitados a contactar al equipo editorial para discutir sus ideas o formatos de propuesta.

No habrá pago por envío y revisión de propuestas. Se invita a utilizar imágenes de alta resolución que deben cumplir el requerimiento de permiso de copyright cuando sea necesario.

Editores

Angel Aedo es profesor asociado en Antropología en la Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile y director alterno del Instituto Milenio para la Investigación en Violencia y Democracia.

Oriana Bernasconi es profesora de Sociología en la Universidad Alberto Hurtado donde también se desempeña como co-directora del Programa de Investigación Interdisciplinaria sobre Memoria y Derechos Humanos. Es investigadora asociada del Instituto Milenio para la Investigación en Violencia y Democracia.

Damian Omar Martínez es investigador en el departamento de Sociología de la Universidad de Murcia (España) e investigador postdoctoral del Instituto Milenio para la Investigación en Violencia y Democracia.

Alicia Olivari es investigadora postdoctoral en la Escuela de Antropología de la Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile y del Instituto Milenio para la Investigación en Violencia y Democracia.

Fernando Pairican es doctor en Historia por la Universidad de Santiago, profesor en la Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile e investigador del Instituto Milenio para la Investigación en Violencia y Democracia.

Juan Porma es profesor de Historia, máster en Ciencias Sociales Aplicadas y candidato a doctor en Historia por la Universidad Católica de Chile.

Referencias

Adkins L (2004) “Reflexivity: Freedom or habit of gender?” In Feminism After   Bourdieu. Malden: Blackwell Publishing, 191-210.

Aedo A, Bernasconi O, Martinez D, Olivari A, Pairican F, Porma J (2024).Widening the Space of Politics. South Atlantic Quarterly, 123(1): 184-191. https://doi.org/10.1215/00382876-10920705

Ahmed S (2010) The Promise of Happiness. Duke University Press.

Bourdieu P (1986) Distinction. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.

Butler J (2002) Bodies and power, revisited. Radical Philosophy 114 (July/August): 13-19.

Chatterjee P (2004) The Politics of the Governed: Reflections on Popular Politics in

Most of the World. New York: Columbia University Press

Cooper M (2017) Family Values. Between Neoliberalism and the New Social Conservatism. Zone Books.

Foucault M (1971) Orders of discourse. Social Science Information, 10(2): 7-30.

Mahmood S (2005) The Politics of Piety: The Islamic Revival and the Feminist Subject. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Malkki L H (1995) Refugees and Exile: From “Refugee Studies” to the National Order of Things. Annual Review of Anthropology, 24: 495–523.

CFC – Social revolts VioDemos 2024